Thursday, 23 January 2020

Happy Handwriting Day!

Today is National Handwriting Day in the United States.

The significance of this annual event has perhaps shifted in an era where official records are increasingly being created, authenticated, transmitted, and stored digitally.

Despite the shift towards electronic records, our sacramental records continue to be handwritten. These are some of the Archdiocese’s most important records that act as official proof of an individual’s participation in church sacraments. Typically, a person's name, parents' names, date of birth, date of baptism, godparents, and the name of the priest should appear on a baptism record.

We thought we’d share with you some good, some bad, and some ugly pages from our earliest sacramental register books. These examples show why it's essential for parishes to create legible and accurate records of sacraments, and help argue the case to continue teaching cursive script!


St. Ann's Parish, Penetanguishene. Combination Register 1846-1877

St. Ann's Parish, Penetanguishene. Combination Register 1846-1877

St. Ann's Parish, Penetanguishene. Baptism Register 1867-1882


Ste. Croix Parish, Lafontaine Marriage Register 1857-1937

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